ASARCIK (GÖKÇE) COVE ANCHORAGE

Marmaris – Muğla – Turkey

GPS : 36°45’37.8″N 28°16’04.2″E / 36.760485, 28.267832

Asarcık is the next small bay to Turunç. Amos Koyu is on the west of Kargataş Adası, lying between points Asarcık Burnu and Zeytin Burnu. The name of the bay is called as Gökçe Koyu or Asarcık Koyu in the charts. The valleys are thicky wooded with pine and olive trees.

Hidden between the resorts of Turunc and Kumlubuk on the Bozburun peninsula, Amos is a small cove tucked between two headlands. It’s a bit rough and ready and the pebbles are scattered with ancient wooden loungers, but there is an unspoilt beauty that makes a stark contrast to the bling and bright lights of Marmaris, which lies across the bay.

There are good depths in the bay. The bay is open to east. There are no obstructions while entering ino the bay. There are summerhouses on the hillsides, among the trees. The beach area is cordoned off by the buoys. Boats can be pushed off in 6 – 11 m off the buoys.

A finger tip extends out from the northern side. Boats go stern or bows-to where convenient and get a line ashore. There is a restaurant with L shape jetty – berting capacity up to 5 boats. You can drop hook in 4 m and go stern. Water and electricty are provided.

There is another anchorage on the northern part of the finger tip. There is room for only one boat.

The ruins of ancient Amos are on the hills. Transport facilities ara available to Turunç 3 km, İçmeler 11 km and Marmaris 25 km.

AMOS ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE
36°45’27.2″N 28°16’08.0″E / 36.757556, 28.268894

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

The nearest archaeological remains to Turunç are at Amos and are accessible from the Asarcık hill, northwest of Kumlubük bay. You can see a fairly well preserved hillside amphitheatre on the northern side of the headland. This has a seating area, side walls and a stage with three chambers. There are plenty of low walls throughout and on the southern side of the site, the outer ramparts and defensive wall are still clearly defined.

The archaeological site is located on the next headland past the Professors’ Estate. This is the Asarcık hill. An information board lets you know when you have reached it. Immediately visible are the remains of the high curtain wall. The site is extremely overgrown and you will need sturdy shoes to walk around it. There are no defined pathways, so some climbing and clambering must be undertaken if you wish to fully explore the ruins.

You can see a fairly well preserved hillside amphitheatre on the northern side of the headland. This has a seating area, side walls and a stage with three chambers. There are plenty of low walls throughout and on the southern side of the site, the outer ramparts and defensive wall are still clearly defined. At the highest point is a temple with statue pedestals surrounding the altar.

At the highest point is a temple with statue pedestals surrounding the altar. The earliest known settlement at Amos dates back to the Hellenistic period (330 – 30 BC). Excavations by a British archaeologist, Professor Bean, in 1948 discovered several inscriptions on stone. Some of these have been translated and reveal that they were rental contracts, which are thought to date to circa 200 BC. Further exploration of the site with possible excavations is planned over the next couple of years.

Tomb at the necropolis.
The remnants of ancient Amos is centered on the elongated hill of Asarcık at Hisarburnu, just above the gulf of Marmaris. The city wall is made of coursed polygonal masonry dated to the Hellenistic period, and is fairly well preserved on the north slope where walls and towers still stand 3 4 metres high. The wall on the south reach has almost disappeared due to erosion. Five towers are preserved, all of which are solid except for one. There is one gate in the northern wall, which is probably the main city gate. On the basis of the type of masonry used, the construction of the original wall has been dated to the 4th century B.C.E.

Of the intra muros remains, the theatre is the most apparent. Of the three known Greek theatres of the Rhodian Peraia, the Amos theatre is the only one with preserved remnants of the skēnē and the orchestra. The approximate number of possible spectators is estimated to around 1300. G. E. Bean found in 1948 a fragmentary altar to Dionysos in the area of the orchestra.

On the top of the hill, just west of the theatre, several fragments of an Hellenistic circular or semi-circular statue base is to be seen. Further to the west, close to the ramparts, are the foundations of a small temple in antis with a pronaos, 6.8 m wide and 13.8 m long. Inscriptions with a temple inventory found in the vicinity show that the temple was probably dedicated to Apollo Samnaios, a deity only known from this location.

The necropolis is located just outside the city proper, north of the city walls. Several rock-cut tombs are visible in the terrain, together with some inscriptions and fragments of monumental architecture.

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Coordinates


28°16'04.2"E

Address

Marmaris, Muğla Province, Turkey

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