OLIMPOS COVE ANCHORAGE

Kumluca – Antalya – Turkey

GPS : 36°23’48.8″N 30°28’36.1″E / 36.396874, 30.476705

Olympos was an ancient city in Lycia. It was situated in a river valley near the coast. Its ruins are located south of the modern town Çıralı in the Kumluca district of Antalya Province, Turkey. Together with the sites of the ancient cities Phaselis and Idyros it is part of the Olympos Beydağları National Park. The perpetual gas fires at Yanartaş are found a few kilometers to the northwest of the site.

The exact date of the city’s foundation is unknown. A wall and an inscription on a sarcophagus have been dated to the end of the 4th century BC, so Olympos must have been founded at the latest in the Hellenistic period. The city presumably taking its name from nearby Mount Olympos (Turkish: Tahtalı Dağı, Timber Mountain), one of over twenty mountains with the name Olympos in the Classical world.

The city was a member of the Lycian League, but it is uncertain when it joined the League. It started minting Lycian League coins from the end of the second century BC, possibly the 130s. At this time Olympos was one of the six largest cities of the League, which possessed three votes each.

Around 100 BC Olympos started issuing its own coins separate from the League. At this point the Cilician pirates had taken control of the city, either through conquest or profitable collaboration with the inhabitants. As a consequence the city abandoned the League or was evicted from it. The pirate chief Zenicetes made it his stronghold from where he controlled the rest of his possessions, which included Corycus, Phaselis and many other places in Pamphylia.

His rule ended in 78 BC, when the Roman commander Publius Servilius Isauricus, accompanied by the young Julius Caesar, captured Olympos and his other territories after a victory at sea.[citation needed] At his defeat Zenicetes set fire to his own house and perished. At the time of the Roman conquest Olympus was described by Cicero as a rich and highly decorated city. Olympos then became part of the Roman Republic. The emperor Hadrian visited the city after which it took the name of Hadrianopolis for a period, in his honour.[citation needed.

Olympos is missing from the Stadiasmus Patarensis and the Stadiasmus Maris Magni. However, both include the already mentioned Corycus, which is described in ancient sources as a port of some significance. There is no evidence that Olympos was a maritime city prior to the 2nd century AD. On this basis Mustafa Adak has argued that Olympos was initially founded on Mount Olympus, which he identifies as Musa Dağı instead of Tahtalı Dağı. In his theory, the Romans destroyed Olympos, after which the population moved to Corycus, and the name of Corycus was changed to Olympos when Hadrian visited the city in 131 AD. In the Middle Ages, Venetians, Genoese and Rhodians built two fortresses along the coast, but by the 15th century Olympos had been abandoned.

Olympus became a Christian bishopric, a suffragan of the metropolitan see of Myra, the capital of the Roman province of Lycia. Its earliest recorded bishop was Saint Methodius of Olympus, whose service at the head of church in Olympus extended from the late 3rd century to his martyrdom in about 311. Aristocritus was at the Council of Ephesus in 431 and the Council of Chalcedon in 451.

Anatolius was a signatory of the joint letter that the bishops of Lycia sent in 458 to Byzantine Emperor Leo I the Thracian regarding the murder of Proterius of Alexandria. Ioannes took part in the synod convoked in 536 by Patriarch Menas of Constantinople. No longer a residential bishopric, Olympus is today listed by the Catholic Church as a titular.

Today the site attracts tourists, not only for the artifacts that can still be found (though fragmentary and widely scattered), but also for its scenic landscapes supporting wild grapevines, flowering oleander, bay trees, figs and pines.

MOUNT OLYMPOS
GPS : 36°23’11.7″N 30°29’04.9″E / 36.386583, 30.484694

Olympos was an ancient city in Lycia. It was situated in a river valley near the coast. Its ruins are located south of the modern town Çıralı in the Kumluca district of Antalya Province, Turkey. In ancient times, the mountain Olympos was called , that is the home of the gods. It shares with many other high mountains this name. In Olympos you can find the Chimaera, a still – burning today underground gas field, which in ancient times was burning much stronger than it is today. The ruins of the ancient city of Phaselis lying at the foot of Tahtalı.

Olympos is a wonderful site near Çıralı Liman. It was built by Lycians and later extended by Romans, Byzantines and Genoans, but deserted since the 13th century. The site at the end of a deep mountain gorge straddles a delightful, frog-filled freshwater creek fed by numerous springs. The original inhabitants were worshippers of Hephaestus, Greek god of fire and blacksmithery, and the renowned ancient site of Chimaera with its flame-emitting volcanic vents is not far away.

Across the stream on the older, southern part of site is a necropolis with an interesting carved tomb of the philosopher Aristarchus, some stretches of the ancient city walls and a very ruined Roman theatre. The northern side of the stream has more tombs (including an impressive tomb complex of Lykarches) and the ruins of a Byzantine church.

The former city of Olympos was founded in the Hellenistic period, presumably taking its name from nearby Mount Olympos (Turkish: Tahtalı Dağı), one of over twenty mountains with the name Olympos in the Classical world. From these mountains of the Solymi, according to Homer, the god Poseidon looked out to sea and saw Odysseus sailing away from Calypso’s island, and called up a great storm that wrecked him on the shores of the island of Nausicaa.

The coins of the city of Olympos date back to the 2nd century BC. It was described by Cicero as an ancient city full of riches and works of art. The city became one of the six leading cities of the Lycian League. In the 1st century BC, Olympos was invaded and settled by Cilician pirates. This ended in 78 BC, when the Roman commander Publius Servilius Isauricus, accompanied by the young Julius Caesar, took the city after a victory at sea, and added Olympos to the Roman Empire. The pirate Zenicetes set fire to his own house and perished. The emperor Hadrian visited the city after which it took the name of Hadrianopolis for a period, in his honour.

The chief deity of Olympos was Hephaestus, god of fire and blacksmiths. Near Olympos, located in the neighbouring village of Çıralı and about 200 metres above sea level, the eternal flames called the Chimaera may be seen issuing from the ground. The fuel source for the flames is natural gas, largely methane, seeping through cracks in the earth. The mythical Chimaera – or Chimera – was a monster with the head of a lion, the body of a goat and the tail of a serpent, who roamed these woods and sprouted fire from her mouth.

In the Middle Ages, Venetians, Genoese and Rhodians built two fortresses along the coast, but by the 15th century Olympos had been abandoned. Today the site attracts tourists, not only for the artifacts that can still be found (though fragmentary and widely scattered), but also for its scenic landscapes supporting wild grapevines, flowering oleander, bay trees, figs and pines.

The Tahtalı is on the east coast of the Teke Peninsula (Lycian Peninsula) and dominates the landscape around Kemer. Can booked Between Antalya and Finike to him as dominant peaks of the mountain range Bey Dağları ( Men’s Mountain) see a part of the way through the south of the Turkey withdrawing Taurus Mountains . Its close proximity to the coast of the Mediterranean Sea makes it far visible to mariners.

He is the highest mountain in the Natural Park of Olympos – Beydağları – Milli Park. From November to often into June , the summit is covered with ice and snow . In the spring of this snow layer is often reddish brown colored by heranwehende feinstaubige Sahara winds , while it is often not seen in the summer because of the clouds. The vegetation-free zone starts at about 1900 meters height.

Funicular Olympos Teleferik
The cable car Olympos Teleferik, a Turkish- Swiss Cooperation , travels since the 16th June 2007 summit of Tahtalı on. Your potential through a street station situated approximately 10 km from Tekirova or Çamyuva at a height of on the eastern slope of the mountain. With a length of 4350 m, the Olympos Teleferik is indeed one of the longer aerial tramways.

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Coordinates

36°23'48.8"N
30°28'36.1"E

Address

Kumluca, Antalya, Turkey

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