YOĞUNDUVAR FISHER HARBOUR

Yoğunduvar, Bozyazı – Mersin – Turkey

GPS : 36°05’54.6″N 32°56’32.3″E / 36.098504, 32.942314

VHF Channels : 16
Call Sign : ” yogunduvar harbour ”

Main Breakwater Lighthouse
GPS : 36°05’52.5″N 32°56’31.9″E / 36.097906, 32.942181

Inner Breakwater Lighthouse
GPS : 36°05’52.9″N 32°56’26.4″E / 36.098037, 32.940652

Bozyazı is a town and district of Mersin Province on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. Established on the outskirts of the Taurus Mountains, the county has a well kept coastal line. With the brook of Bozyazi, the historical houses, and the good service to the yacht tourism, the county is visited everyday by more and more people. A two-lane street leads to the coast.

It has a lot of potential for an expanding tourism industry. Since there is no industrial plants or heavily populated areas within the borders of Bozyazı, the sea along the coast is extremely clean. There are also hotels providing good quality service. There are makeshift restaurants and cafés along the shore. They also provide beach chairs and umbrellas for the bathers.

The brook called Sini flows through the middle of the town and reaches the sea. The Sini Stream also serves as a shelter for small fishing boats. Once they pass under the new bridge built over an antique one, the boats are protected against the waves and storms of the sea. It is sufficient to tie the rope to a tree trunk and leave it there.

There are a lot of fish in the brook. Especially carp is very common. Fish from the sea also come here to lay their eggs. Trout caught closer to the source of the stream up in the Taurus Mountains is tastier than the ones closer to the sea.

The Sini Stream also serves as a shelter for small fishing boats. Once they pass under the new bridge built over an antique one, the boats are protected against the waves and storms of the sea. It is sufficient to tie the rope to a tree trunk and leave it there.

Walking down the narrow street you arrive at the seaside where you will see the small offshore island linked to the mainland by a narrow strip of road. The narrow road looks like a breakwater has sandy beaches on both sides.

MARINA

It has the biggest and most modern fishermen’s shelter of the whole province of Mersin. The shelter is almost like a marine where yachtsmen moor their boats during the summer months.

The Sini Stream also serves as a shelter for small fishing boats. Once they pass under the new bridge built over an antique one, the boats are protected against the waves and storms of the sea. It is sufficient to tie the rope to a tree trunk and leave it there.

Capacity : 250 Boats

Main Breakwater : 750 m
Inner Breakwater : 275 m

HARBOUR FACILITIES
Electricity
Drinkable Water
Fuel
WC/Shower
Buffet
Custom Office

Administration : Bozyazı Fishery Products Cooperative

TOWN FACILITIES
Repairing & Maintenance Workshops : Bozyazı
Technical Equipment Shops : Bozyazı
Health : Hospital, Health Centers, Doctors, Nurses, Ambulances, Pharmacies, Dentists
Museum : Anamur City
Accommodation : Hotels, Motels, Pensions, Rental Houses, Apart Hotels
Shopping : Markets, Shops, Stores, Fish Market
Communication : Post Office, Phone, Internet, Wi-Fi
Hair dresser
Laundry
Beach : On the beach there are showers and WC for the bathers.
Dining : Fish Restaurants, Cafes, Buffets, Restaurants, Bakeries
Special Shopping : Bananas, Citrus Fruits, Peanuts.

MARKET PLACE
There is a marketplace next to the clock tower. It is a very colorful marketplace where fresh fruits and vegetables growing on the fertile plain of Bozyazı are sold along with textiles and other good brought in from big cities. On the coast there are fishmongers and cafes.

THE MEDITERRANEAN MONK SEAL
The sea is clean and Bozyazı is home to an important colony of the endangered Mediterranean Monk Seal. The Mediterranean Monk Seal (Monachus monachus) is a pinniped belonging to the Phocidae family. At some 350-450 (fewer than 500) remaining individuals it is believed to be the world’s second rarest pinniped (second only to the Saimaa Ringed Seal), and one of the most endangered mammals in the world. It is present in parts of the Mediterranean Sea and the Eastern Atlantic Ocean waters around the Tropic of Cancer as well.

FISH RESTAURANTS
They are clean and have pleasant services. Fishes available due to seasons.

FISH AND SEA PRODUCT SPECIES LIST OF THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA

There are a lot of fish in the brook. Especially carp is very common. Fish from the sea also come here to lay their eggs. Trout caught closer to the source of the stream up in the Taurus Mountains is tastier than the ones closer to the sea.

TOWN
Don’t get shocked when you see the rows of apartment buildings on both sides of the street when you arrive in Bozyazı. Because further down there is a beautiful coast, a small island linked to the mainland through an isthmus, a lovely brook, some houses that display the traditional features of civilian architecture and a rich history. The brook called Sini flows through the middle of the town and reaches the sea.

When you turn right after crossing the bridge you enter a narrow street flanked with old houses, some of them dilapidated but others in good condition. Walking down the narrow street you arrive at the seaside where you will see the small offshore island linked to the mainland by a narrow strip of road. The narrow road looks like a breakwater has sandy beaches on both sides.

When you turn left after crossing the bridge the meandering road takes you towards a hill passing between old houses in gardens. As you climb up, the road gets worse but the scenery gets better. It is not a long and tedious road anyway. From the side of the hill you get scenery of rooftops of the houses on the slopes, the sea and the island. The only attraction on the hill is not the scenery. There are also the ruins of an antique city here. We can see the ruins that are above the ground surface.

COASTLINE
A two-lane street leads to the coast. There are fishmongers, makeshift restaurants and cafes along the shore. They also provide beach chairs and umbrellas for the bathers. There are historical houses along the coastline too. The chimneys of these houses have very interesting shapes. Each one is different.

HISTORY
The ruins of the ancient city of Nagidos are on a hill above the town of Bozyazı. They are being excavated by a team from Mersin University who have found traces of occupation going back to the Hellenistic period of the 4th century BC, when Nagidos was an outpost of Rhodes and Samos, a small port established to trade goods from Egypt and Cyprus. The town was subsequently controlled by Egyptians, Ancient Romans, Byzantines and Seljuk Turks.

THE ANTIQUE CITY OF NAGIDOS
GPS : 36°05’59.0″N 32°58’41.0″E / 36.099722, 32.978056

Nagidos was an ancient city of Cilicia. In ancient times it was located between Anemurion to the west and Arsinoe to the east. Today its ruins are found on a hill at the mouth of the Sini Çay (Bozyazı Dere) near Bozyazı in Mersin Province, Turkey. It lies at a distance of ca. 20 km to the east of Anamur. Like its eastern neighbor Kelenderis, it was a colony of Samos. The small island of Nagidoussa is opposite Nagidos; on it are the ruins of an Ottoman fortress.

History
The details of the foundation and eventual abandonment of the city are unknown. From the end of the fifth century BC, the town minted staters that had both Greek and Aramaic inscriptions, one of which bears the name of the Persian satrap Pharnabazus. The Nagidos mint used a grape cluster as a symbol on the reverse. The goddess Aphrodite appears most often on the coins of Nagidos, indicating that her sanctuary must have been the most important in the city.

The Hellenistic period and the foundation of Arsinoe
In 333 BC the city was conquered along with the rest of Cilicia by Alexander the Great. After his death Cilicia briefly came under the control of the Seleucid Empire. Together with Mallos the city participated in the foundation of Antioch on the Maeander somewhere between 281 and 270 BC. In approximately 270 BC Cilicia was conquered by the Ptolemaic Empire during the Syrian Wars.

In this period the city of Arsinoe was founded between 279 and 260–253 BC on land taken from Nagidos by Aetos, the Ptolemaic strategos or military governor of Cilicia. Aetos was succeeded as strategos by his son Thraseas. At that time the Nagidians still refused to recognize the settlers of Arsinoe as the new owners of the land. To resolve the dispute Thraseas requested Nagidos to cede the land to Arsinoe, which the city agreed to. In exchange the citizens of Arsinoe became apoikoi of Nagidos, which meant that their city would be independent from Nagidos. Both cities exchanged isopoliteia so that the citizens of both cities enjoyed a single citizenship.

Designating the citizens of Arsinoe as apokoi of Nagidos meant that Nagidos was treated as the mother city of Arsinoe. Christian Habicht interprets this as a diplomatic move of Thraseas to appease Nagidos for its loss of territory. John K. Davies gives a slightly different chronology, estimating the foundation of Arsinoe to have taken place probably in the 260s BC. He writes that Cilicia was then temporarily lost to the Seleucids but retaken by Ptolemaics in the 240s. According to him the dispute over the land occurred after the reestablishment of Ptolemaic control and the Arsinoeis appealed to Thraseas some time after 238 BC.

Along with the rest of Cilicia, Nagidos came under Seleucid rule in 197 BC. Excavations have shown that the city was abandoned towards the middle of the second century BC. Possibly this was a consequence of the activities of the Cilician pirates.

Excavations
Ancient sources gave an important clue to the location of Nagidos because they mention the island Nagidoussa lay offshore from the city. This allowed the Austrian archaeologists Rudolf Heberdey and Adolf Wilhelm to identify the site at its current location in 1891. In the 1930s a Swedish expedition carried out explorations. In 1986 the museum of Anamur discovered 24 graves, the oldest dating back to the fifth century BC.

THE ANTIQUE CITY OF ARSIONE
On the 2nd km of the Bozyazı – Mersin road there is a hill named Maraş rising smoothly on the seaside. Some experts think that the ruins on this hill belong to the city of Arsione. The existence of Arsione is known from the writings of antique historians like Strabon and Pilinus. The Inscription of Peace found in Bozyazı also confirms the existence of Arsione.

There are remnants of an antique civilization on the ground surface on the rocky promontory. To the west of the ruins, there is a cove, which could have been used as a natural port. On the northern slopes of the hill, there are ruins among the bushes that indicate the existence of a Roman – Byzantine settlement. The foundations and some of the walls of the buildings are still standing.

There are the ruins of three Byzantine churches at the center of the settlement area. Church walls are built with unhewn rocks and the foundation plan of the buildings can be discerned from the remaining parts. To the west of the settlement area there are vaulted and domed Roman tombs again built with roughly hewn stones. On the exterior surfaces, marks of mosaics can be seen. This settlement seems to be abandoned during the early Middle Ages but resettled in later times.

TRANSPORT
Bozyazı – Anamur 10 km, Mersin 220 km (137 mi).
Minibus : Bozyazı – Anamur
Bus : Bozyazı – Gazipaşa, Anamur, Taşucu, Silifke, Erdemli, Mersin
Seabus : Anamur – Girne
Airport : Adana Şakirpaşa International Airport, Konya International Airport, Dalaman International Airport, Antalya International Airport, Gazipaşa International Airport

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Coordinates

36°05'54.6"N
32°56'32.3"E

Address

Merkez Mahallesi, 33835 Bozyazı/Mersin Province, Turkey

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